Wednesday, November 22, 2017

Rodricus Crawford: Louisiana; Major Development: Released from death row, he alleges in a freshly launched lawsuit that the wrongful conviction which almost took his life (he is now only 29) was caused by a biased autopsy and a prosecutor's racism..." Rodricus Crawford, 29, sued the Caddo Parish coroner and district attorney's offices last Thursday, one year after the Louisiana Supreme Court overturned his first-degree murder conviction in the death of his 1-year-old son Roderius. Crawford's lawsuit claims authorities recklessly disregarded medical evidence that his son, Roderius Lott, had pneumonia and died of natural causes."..."The night before his son's death, Crawford and the child were sleeping in a fold-out couch. Relatives called 911 after Crawford woke up the next morning and noticed his son wasn't moving or breathing. The parish coroner had a "preconceived suspicion" that the child had been smothered to death based on the family's race and neighborhood where they lived, the suit says. The forensic pathologist who performed the autopsy didn't take routine tissue samples that would have shown the timing of the child's injuries, the suit says. The pathologist also falsely claimed that bacteria found in the child's blood may have come from a contaminated sample, it adds."


STORY: "Man freed from death row blames conviction on racial bias," by AP reporter Michael Kunzelman, published by WRAL on November 20 2107.

GIST:  "A biased autopsy and a prosecutor's racism and religious fervor corrupted the murder case against a black man freed from Louisiana's death row, a federal lawsuit says.   Rodricus Crawford, 29, sued the Caddo Parish coroner and district attorney's offices last Thursday, one year after the Louisiana Supreme Court overturned his first-degree murder conviction in the death of his 1-year-old son.   Crawford's lawsuit claims authorities recklessly disregarded medical evidence that his son, Roderius Lott, had pneumonia and died of natural causes. Investigators accused Crawford of smothering the child at their Shreveport home in February 2012. The suit also says Crawford was deprived of a fair trial by a prosecutor with a "racist world view" who followed a "biblical command" to secure the death penalty against black defendants. That prosecutor, former acting District Attorney Dale Cox, is an outspoken advocate of the death penalty who told a reporter he believes the state needs to "kill more people." Cox personally prosecuted one-third of the Louisiana cases that resulted in death sentences between 2010 and 2015, according to the Death Penalty Information Center.  Caddo Parish has a "well-known history of racism and the arbitrary application of the death penalty," the lawsuit says. The night before his son's death, Crawford and the child were sleeping in a fold-out couch. Relatives called 911 after Crawford woke up the next morning and noticed his son wasn't moving or breathing. The parish coroner had a "preconceived suspicion" that the child had been smothered to death based on the family's race and neighborhood where they lived, the suit says. The forensic pathologist who performed the autopsy didn't take routine tissue samples that would have shown the timing of the child's injuries, the suit says. The pathologist also falsely claimed that bacteria found in the child's blood may have come from a contaminated sample, it adds. Their "preconceived expectations and theories were based on race and racism, and they operated with deliberate indifference to these accepted professional standards of practice," the lawsuit says. The suit describes Crawford as a "proud and loving father" and accuses Cox of falsely portraying him as an absentee dad during his trial. "This argument was based on racial stereotypes and animus, and not upon the facts of this case," it says. Cox said Monday that he hadn't seen the lawsuit and couldn't comment on its allegations. John Prime, a spokesman for both the coroner and district attorney's offices, said he can't comment on pending litigation. James Stewart, who also is named as a defendant in the suit, became the first black district attorney in Caddo Parish after Cox decided not to run for election. Crawford was sentenced to death in November 2013 and remained on death row until the state Supreme Court reversed his conviction last year. The district attorney's office declined to retry him."






 http://www.wral.com/man-freed-from-death-row-blames-conviction-on-racial-bias/17129648/

For more insights into Louisiana's perverse criminal justice system read the following Wrongful Conviction Blog post at the link below..."Anyone interested in criminal justice knows that our system is broken. Two recent cases out of Louisiana highlight just how broken our system really is."
https://wrongfulconvictionsblog.org/2017/11/20/two-travesties-of-justice-and-not-a-single-apology-in-sight/

PUBLISHER'S NOTE: I am monitoring this case/issue. Keep your eye on the Charles Smith Blog for reports on developments. The Toronto Star, my previous employer for more than twenty incredible years, has put considerable effort into exposing the harm caused by Dr. Charles Smith and his protectors - and into pushing for reform of Ontario's forensic pediatric pathology system. The Star has a "topic" section which focuses on recent stories related to Dr. Charles Smith. It can be found at: http://www.thestar.com/topic/charlessmith. Information on "The Charles Smith Blog Award"- and its nomination process - can be found at: http://smithforensic.blogspot.com/2011/05/charles-smith-blog-award-nominations.html Please send any comments or information on other cases and issues of interest to the readers of this blog to: hlevy15@gmail.com. Harold Levy; Publisher; The Charles Smith Blog.

Tuesday, November 21, 2017

Randox Testing Services Laboratory. Trimega Laboratories; (UK); (A mega-forensic lab catastrophe with aspects of Motherisk, Farak and Dookhan. HL); "Convictions in doubt as more than 10,000 cases could be affected by data manipulation at forensics," The Independent reports..."Two men formerly employed by Randox Testing Services (RTS) have been arrested, and five interviewed under caution by Greater Manchester Police over the case. The two arrested suspects are understood to have previously worked at another firm called Trimega Laboratories, which is also being investigated by police over potential manipulation that could affect child protection and family court cases. Nick Hurd, the policing minister, said the same techniques seen at RTS may have occurred at Trimega between 2010 and 2014. In a written statement, he said the tests involved were used to detect the presence of drugs or alcohol in hair, blood or urine – evidence that may later be relied upon in court. “The Government recognises the seriousness of this issue, and the potential impact on public confidence in the use of forensic science within the justice system,” Mr Hurd said. “The senior judiciary are aware, and Government officials are working with the police to monitor the scale of the issue as information emerges.” The Ministry of Justice has not yet found any affected civil cases affected, but the results may also have been used by schools and local authorities making child protection decisions, or by private employers testing of their employees for banned substances. Mr Hurd said it may never be possible to identify the true number of Trimega customers affected, due to poor record-keeping, and that its samples cannot be retested."


STORY: "Convictions in doubt as more than 10,000 cases could be affected by data manipulation at forensics," by Home Affairs Correspondent Lizzie Dearden, published by The Independent on November 21.

SUB-HEADING: "Scandal has caused drug driving cases to be dropped and deaths referred to the Court of Appeal."

PHOTO CAPTION:  "Randox analysis has been used in cases for driving offences, violent crime, sexual offences and unexplained deaths."

STORY: "More than 10,000 criminal cases may have been affected by alleged manipulation at a forensics lab that analysed evidence of drug driving, violent crime, sexual offences and unexplained deaths, it has been revealed. Around 50 cases that were due to go to trial have been dropped over the scandal at a Randox Testing Services laboratory in Manchester, the National Police Chiefs’ Council (NPCC) said. Two road deaths have been referred to the Court of Appeal. They are just a fraction of the alleged cases across 42 police force areas in England and Wales that could be affected by the alleged data manipulation, which dates back to 2013. The cases could result in court hearings being adjourned or thrown out because of the need for retesting. Two men formerly employed by Randox Testing Services (RTS) have been arrested, and five interviewed under caution by Greater Manchester Police over the case. The two arrested suspects are understood to have previously worked at another firm called Trimega Laboratories, which is also being investigated by police over potential manipulation that could affect child protection and family court cases. Nick Hurd, the policing minister, said the same techniques seen at RTS may have occurred at Trimega between 2010 and 2014. In a written statement, he said the tests involved were used to detect the presence of drugs or alcohol in hair, blood or urine – evidence that may later be relied upon in court. “The Government recognises the seriousness of this issue, and the potential impact on public confidence in the use of forensic science within the justice system,” Mr Hurd said. “The senior judiciary are aware, and Government officials are working with the police to monitor the scale of the issue as information emerges.” The Ministry of Justice has not yet found any affected civil cases affected, but the results may also have been used by schools and local authorities making child protection decisions, or by private employers testing of their employees for banned substances. Mr Hurd said it may never be possible to identify the true number of Trimega customers affected, due to poor record-keeping, and that its samples cannot be retested. But he added: “It is unlikely that decisions about the welfare of children will have been taken solely on the basis of toxicology test results. However, the Department for Education has asked local authorities to assure themselves that the rationale for decisions made about children’s safety and wellbeing is not now called into question.” RTS was mainly commissioned by individual police forces investigating criminal offences, as well as for hair-strand tests for drugs and alcohol in civil and family jurisdictions. The NSPCC said 70 per cent of the highest priority criminal cases had already been submitted for retests, and the rest will be completed by mid-2018. Three quarters of those potentially affected are related to Road Traffic Act offences such as drug driving. Deputy Chief Constable James Vaughan, the NPCC lead for forensics, said the system’s integrity was vital for British policing. “We have worked at pace to respond to this serious breach of standards and take action in cases where people’s lives could have been affected,” he added. “We are striving to complete all cases requiring retesting as quickly as possible so we will continue to explore ways of speeding up the processes. “Early results from retesting have identified no impact on crime cases such as sexual offences, violence or homicide. So far, fewer than 10 per cent of retests have resulted in drug driving cases being discontinued.” Mr Vaughan cautioned that although no murder and rape cases have yet been found unreliable, some could be in a lower priority band for testing which have yet to be reanalysed. It is expected to take up to three years to retest the evidence in all 10,000 cases because of “limited specialist, independent capacity” in forensics – although assessments may conclude that the measure is not necessary in every incident. All live cases will be subject to retests, with the new results being used in court, and defendants will be informed if investigations cast any doubt on their conviction. The NPCC, which is working with the Forensic Science Regulator, Crown Prosecution Service (CPS), Home Office and local forces, does not expect to know the full impact on the criminal justice system for several months. The alleged manipulation came to light in January, when a data anomaly in a drug driving case was reported to RTS and the company alerted Greater Manchester Police. RTS, which is based in Northern Ireland and has offices in London and Manchester, describes itself as a “market leader in the drug and alcohol testing industry” and boasts of “state-of-the-art” work for police, family law, child services, aviation, maritime and construction industries on its website. The company said it was supporting the ongoing investigation, while covering the costs of retesting samples at accredited external laboratories. “The alleged manipulation in RTS involved changing data in testing methods which had been accredited by the United Kingdom Accreditation Service (UKAS),” a spokesperson added. “The actual samples were not affected which has enabled retesting, and there is no evidence to suggest that the core purpose of the manipulation was intended to create positive or negative results in any specific tests.” The firm said it took on staff from other companies when it was founded in 2014, including the two arrested suspects who had worked at the now-defunct Trimega Laboratories Ltd. Dr Mark Piper, the toxicology manager at RTS, said: “We have acted as whistleblower to ensure the integrity of the criminal justice system. We will continue to work with Greater Manchester Police and the appropriate authorities in the investigation. “We will do all that we can to ensure this situation is resolved and deeply regret the distress that has been caused. “We are now well-advanced in developing a foolproof testing system which would enhance the security of our operations in the future, to provide the necessary level of confidence.” Gillian Tully, of the Forensic Services Regulator, said all major forensic toxicology suppliers were asked to carry out a detailed audit to ensure the issue was not more widespread, but that investigations uncovered no data manipulation, adding: “I'm not going to speculate on any motives because obviously there is an ongoing criminal investigation, but we cannot just say it was a minor technical issue."

The entire story can be found at:













http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/crime/forensic-labs-data-manipulation-criminal-convictions-doubt-randox-testing-services-investigation-a8066966.html

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PUBLISHER'S NOTE: I am monitoring this case/issue. Keep your eye on the Charles Smith Blog for reports on developments. The Toronto Star, my previous employer for more than twenty incredible years, has put considerable effort into exposing the harm caused by Dr. Charles Smith and his protectors - and into pushing for reform of Ontario's forensic pediatric pathology system. The Star has a "topic" section which focuses on recent stories related to Dr. Charles Smith. It can be found at: http://www.thestar.com/topic/charlessmith. Information on "The Charles Smith Blog Award"- and its nomination process - can be found at: http://smithforensic.blogspot.com/2011/05/charles-smith-blog-award-nominations.html Please send any comments or information on other cases and issues of interest to the readers of this blog to: hlevy15@gmail.com. Harold Levy; Publisher; The Charles Smith Blog.





















Wrongful confessions (4): Jose Maysonet: Chicago, Illinois: Extraordinary development: His release is followed within days by the vacation of felony convictions in the same county for 15 defendants who claimed they had been framed by the police - prosecutorial acts which have been labelled an attorney as the first “mass exoneration” in Cook County..."Mark Rotert, head of Foxx’s Conviction Integrity Unit, said the office could not stand behind the cases after reviewing claims brought by the 15 defendants, who said Watts and his fellow officers planted evidence and filed false reports. “In these cases, we concluded, unfortunately, that police were not being truthful and we could not have confidence in the integrity of their reports and their testimony,” Rotert said. “So in good conscience, we could not see these convictions stand.”


PASSAGE OF THE DAY: "The felony charges wiped out yesterday typically were drug cases, convictions that landed the defendants in prison for a few years. Leonard Gipson, 36, was convicted twice on charges in which Watts planted drugs on him, after, Gipson said, he refused to give cash to Watts. “Every time I ran into him, he put drugs on me,” said Gipson.  “Everyone knows, if you’re not going to pay Watts, you’re going to jail.” Gipson, who had claimed in court that he’d been framed, and only pleaded guilty after a judge ruled he had no proof Watts had planted drugs on him. Gipson also had filed a complaint about Watts with the CPD, which went nowhere. “Everyone knew what he was doing.” Since filing his petition in April, Tepfer said he has been contacted by dozens of others who have made similar allegations against Watts. Tepfer has estimated hundreds of cases handled by Watts and officers who reported to him, are bogus. Watts and his subordinate officers routinely hung felony cases on residents of the complex as retribution against those who resisted when he demanded cash, or if they filed complaints against him. Watts’ officers would plant drugs and falsify reports to make the charges stick, Tepfer said."

STORY: "Convictions vacated for 15 framed by corrupt cop Ronald Watts," by reporter Andy Grimm, published by The Chicago Sun-Times on November 19, 2017.

GIST: "A Cook County judge Thursday vacated felony convictions for 15 defendants who claimed they were framed by disgraced Chicago Police Sgt. Ronald Watts, following a landmark decision by the State’s Attorney’s Office to toss aside a string of cases over allegations of police misconduct. With 10 of the defendants standing in the courtroom, Chief Criminal Courts Judge Judge LeRoy K. Martin approved a motion by prosecutors to throw out a total of 18 cases against 15 men who were arrested by Watts and members of a tactical team that operated in the Ida B. Wells housing projects. After the hearing, attorney Joshua Tepfer said the move by State’s Attorney Kim Foxx marked the first “mass exoneration” in the history of Cook County. “It’s an extraordinary sign of what’s going on in this county and this city to have a…crucial law enforcement entity take this step and overturn all these convictions in recognition of a systemic problem of police corruption,” he said.  Mark Rotert, head of Foxx’s Conviction Integrity Unit, said the office could not stand behind the cases after reviewing claims brought by the 15 defendants, who said Watts and his fellow officers planted evidence and filed false reports. “In these cases, we concluded, unfortunately, that police were not being truthful and we could not have confidence in the integrity of their reports and their testimony,” Rotert said. “So in good conscience, we could not see these convictions stand.” The decision by the state’s attorney to toss the convictions was first reported by Sun-Times columnist Michael Sneed. Lawyers for the University of Chicago’s Exoneration Project two months ago filed a petition to throw out convictions in 18 cases brought against the 15 defendants, mostly drug charges in which they claim they were shaken down by Watts and officers under his command. Watts and fellow officer Kallatt Mohammed in 2013 pleaded guilty to stealing $5,200 from an FBI informant. Two of the men exonerated Thursday were currently jailed on unrelated cases, Tepfer said. Watts could not be reached for comment. The hearing, coincidentally, came during a whirlwind 72-hour span that had seen two men released from prison after spending decades in prison based on claims they had been framed by other Chicago Police officers.Tuesday, prosecutors dropped their case against Arthur Brown, who had spent 29 years in prison for a deadly 1988 arson fire, and Wednesday, Jose Maysonet walked out of the Cook County Jail after spending 27 years jailed for a 1990 double-murder. The State’s Attorney’s Office said they were troubled by discrepancies in the evidence in Brown’s case. Prosecutors said they were unable to move forward with their case against Maysonet after five CPD officers refused to testify under oath about allegations Maysonet was beaten into confessing. Police Board President Lori Lightfoot said Thursday the fact that “so many Chicago Police officers asserted their Fifth Amendment rights” to avoid testifying under oath is a “horrible, unacceptable circumstance that must be addressed immediately.” She added: “All of the efforts that we are are trying to undertake to reform the police department and bridge the gap between police and the community will be negatively affected if officers who commit crimes and admit to it are able to walk away with impunity.” Foxx, who took office last year after beating incumbent Anita Alvarez with a campaign that pledged to reform the county’s criminal justice system, had said earlier this year her office was reviewing cases handled by Watts’ team. The felony charges wiped out yesterday typically were drug cases, convictions that landed the defendants in prison for a few years. Leonard Gipson, 36, was convicted twice on charges in which Watts planted drugs on him, after, Gipson said, he refused to give cash to Watts. “Every time I ran into him, he put drugs on me,” said Gipson.  “Everyone knows, if you’re not going to pay Watts, you’re going to jail.” Gipson, who had claimed in court that he’d been framed, and only pleaded guilty after a judge ruled he had no proof Watts had planted drugs on him. Gipson also had filed a complaint about Watts with the CPD, which went nowhere. “Everyone knew what he was doing.” Since filing his petition in April, Tepfer said he has been contacted by dozens of others who have made similar allegations against Watts. Tepfer has estimated hundreds of cases handled by Watts and officers who reported to him, are bogus. Watts and his subordinate officers routinely hung felony cases on residents of the complex as retribution against those who resisted when he demanded cash, or if they filed complaints against him. Watts’ officers would plant drugs and falsify reports to make the charges stick, Tepfer said. Tepfer and other civil rights lawyers had pressed Alvarez, to appoint a “special master” to consider clearing defendants in possibly hundreds of arrests made by Watts and officers who worked in his unit. Rotert declined to give details on the “exacting process” of reviewing cases. “Cases have to be evaluated individually and on their own facts. I’ll take a look at any case that anyone wants to bring that they believe is affected by corruption,” Rotert said. “But rather than pre-judge it, I’m going to tell you what I think after I’ve reviewed all the evidence.” The latest blow to law enforcement in Chicago comes at a time when Mayor Rahm Emanuel is investing $27.4 million in police reform. The mayor finalized that 2018 investment without consulting Illinois Attorney General Lisa Madigan, with whom he is supposed to be negotiating a consent decree culminating in the appointment of a federal monitor to ride herd over the Chicago Police Department. “When you have such high-profile actions by officers who acknowledge criminal conduct, it’s a significant blow. There’s no sugar-coating it,” Lightfoot said. “These officers bring shame upon their fellow officers who work very hard to do their jobs the right way in compliance with the Constitution and the law.”

The entire story can be found at:

https://chicago.suntimes.com/chicago-politics/states-attorney-vacates-convictions-for-cases-tied-to-corrupt-cop-ronald-watts/amp/

PUBLISHER'S NOTE: I am monitoring this case/issue. Keep your eye on the Charles Smith Blog for reports on developments. The Toronto Star, my previous employer for more than twenty incredible years, has put considerable effort into exposing the harm caused by Dr. Charles Smith and his protectors - and into pushing for reform of Ontario's forensic pediatric pathology system. The Star has a "topic" section which focuses on recent stories related to Dr. Charles Smith. It can be found at: http://www.thestar.com/topic/charlessmith. Information on "The Charles Smith Blog Award"- and its nomination process - can be found at: http://smithforensic.blogspot.com/2011/05/charles-smith-blog-award-nominations.html Please send any comments or information on other cases and issues of interest to the readers of this blog to: hlevy15@gmail.com. Harold Levy; Publisher; The Charles Smith Blog.

Monday, November 20, 2017

False confessions (3): Jose Maysonet; Chicago, Illinois; One of at least 51 people who accused retired detective Reynaldo Guevara of actions from beating them into false confessions to tampering with witnesses, Buzzfeed reports. Now, the officers are seeking immunity and refusing to testify..."Jose Maysonet, 49, has repeatedly claimed that Chicago detective Reynaldo Guevara beat him into confessing to the 1990 murders of two brothers. Maysonet was granted a retrial last year on the grounds that he had been denied effective counsel. Hours before a preliminary hearing in that retrial, attorneys for Guevara and four other officers in Maysonet’s case announced that they would invoke their Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination."...Attorney for the two officers: "An attorney for two of the officers, Fernando Montilla and Roland Paulnitsky, said they were angered over the prosecution’s decision. The attorney, Timothy Grace, told BuzzFeed News that his clients decided that they would invoke their Fifth Amendment rights after Kim Foxx of the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office declined to grant the officers immunity in exchange for their testimony. His clients “didn’t do anything improper,” Grace said, but they wanted protection so they couldn’t be targeted in future cases given what he calls the “hysteria” of the wrongful conviction movement. Maysonet’s attorney, Jennifer Bonjean, offered a different explanation: “They feared prosecution for what they did, which was frame my client,” aided by the complicity and the silence of other officers. The officers’ refusal to testify, she added, is evidence that the division where Guevara and other officers worked “is rotten to the core.”


PASSAGE OF THE DAY: "Grace said, but they wanted protection so they couldn’t be targeted in future cases given what he calls the “hysteria” of the wrongful conviction movement."

Timothy Grace: Lawyer for two of the officers;

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PUBLISHER'S NOTE: The Charles Smith Blog  is interested in false confessions because of the disturbing number of exonerations in the USA, Canada and multiple other jurisdictions throughout the world, where, in the absence of incriminating forensic evidence the conviction is based on self-incrimination – and because of the growing body of  scientific research showing how vulnerable suspects    (especially juveniles)  are to widely used interrogation methods  such as  the notorious ‘Reid Technique.’

Harold Levy: Publisher; The Charles Smith Blog;

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STORY: "Dozens Say This Cop Framed Them. One Just Went Free After 27 Years," by reporter Melissa Segura, published by Buzzfeed on November 15, 2017.



SUB-HEADING: "Detective Reynaldo Guevara has been accused of framing more than 50 people for murder. He and other officers said they would not testify in the retrial of one of those defendants. Prosecutors said they had no choice but to drop the case."

GIST: "A Chicago man who served 27 years for a double murder walked free today, after the police officers he says framed him refused to testify at his retrial. Jose Maysonet, 49, has repeatedly claimed that Chicago detective Reynaldo Guevara beat him into confessing to the 1990 murders of two brothers. Maysonet was granted a retrial last year on the grounds that he had been denied effective counsel. Hours before a preliminary hearing in that retrial, attorneys for Guevara and four other officers in Maysonet’s case announced that they would invoke their Fifth Amendment right against self-incrimination. Without the officers’ testimony, prosecutors determined they couldn’t meet their burden of proof. The state’s attorney’s office “continues to maintain that he is guilty and that Mr. Maysonet’s statements are not the product of police misconduct,” Eric Sussman, first assistant state’s attorney, told the court. Sussman said he dropped the charges with “deep regret and sadness for the victims in this case.” An attorney for two of the officers, Fernando Montilla and Roland Paulnitsky, said they were angered over the prosecution’s decision. The attorney, Timothy Grace, told BuzzFeed News that his clients decided that they would invoke their Fifth Amendment rights after Kim Foxx of the Cook County State’s Attorney’s Office declined to grant the officers immunity in exchange for their testimony. His clients “didn’t do anything improper,” Grace said, but they wanted protection so they couldn’t be targeted in future cases given what he calls the “hysteria” of the wrongful conviction movement. Maysonet’s attorney, Jennifer Bonjean, offered a different explanation: “They feared prosecution for what they did, which was frame my client,” aided by the complicity and the silence of other officers. The officers’ refusal to testify, she added, is evidence that the division where Guevara and other officers worked “is rotten to the core.” The officers’ request for immunity and refusal to testify points to a rift between Foxx, who campaigned on a reformist agenda, and police. Foxx has been criticized by both the police officers’ union, for putting officers like Guevara on the stand, and the families of Guevara’s accusers, who say her office isn’t doing enough to ensure innocent men aren’t behind bars. While officers and prosecutors bemoaned Maysonet’s release, his mother, Miriam LaJara, along with other family members, sat in the front row of the courtroom, sobbing with joy. His sister, Rosa, rocked back and forth repeating, “Thank you, Jesus. Thank you, Jesus.” Maysonet is the fifth man in the last two years whose conviction has been tossed after allegations of Guevara’s misconduct. At least 51 people accuse the retired detective of actions from beating them into false confessions to tampering with witnesses. In a pretrial hearing last month, Maysonet, an admitted former drug dealer, said he paid Guevara at least $1,000 a week in exchange for protection from arrest. Maysonet stopped paying the detectives after a bitter dispute, Maysonet’s attorney told the court. Three months later, she said, Maysonet was framed the double murder. “I’m still shocked,” Maysonet said as he was set free. The codefendant in Maysonet’s case, Alfredo Gonzalez, is also appealing his conviction."

The entire story can be found at: 

https://www.buzzfeed.com/melissasegura/dozens-say-this-cop-framed-them-one-just-went-free-after-27?utm_term=.ebNND3lPJ4#.yggrz4x36     

See related post (August 3, 2016) on this Blog: Detective Reynaldo Guevara; Chicago, Illinois; False confessions and police tainted witnesses; Armando Serrano and Jose Montanez: Blogger Curtis Black's story in Chicago Reporter on how the wrongful convictions of these two men point to more victims of Det. Guevara who say they are currently serving long prison sentences because they were railroaded by Guevara..."Meanwhile, scores of Latino men serving long sentences – who, like Montanez and Serrano, maintain they were railroaded by disgraced Chicago police Detective Reynaldo Guevara – continue to wait. Among them are Gabriel Solache and Arturo DeLeon-Reyes, whose long-sought hearing on whether their confessions were coerced by Guevara is scheduled for Thursday morning. (On Thursday morning, prosecutors requested a postponement.)"...."As in so many of Guevara’s cases, no physical evidence linked the suspect to the crime. The witness upon whose testimony their conviction was based said Guevara told him what to say and promised he’d get a break on his own armed robbery charge. Attorneys argued that this was a pattern that appeared again and again in Guevara’s cases. “What is new here that wasn’t known 12 years ago?” asked Rob Warden, the veteran journalist who is now co-director of Injustice Watch."  http://smithforensic.blogspot.ca/2016/08/detective-reynaldo-guevara-chicago.html

PUBLISHER'S NOTE: I am monitoring this case/issue. Keep your eye on the Charles Smith Blog for reports on developments. The Toronto Star, my previous employer for more than twenty incredible years, has put considerable effort into exposing the harm caused by Dr. Charles Smith and his protectors - and into pushing for reform of Ontario's forensic pediatric pathology system. The Star has a "topic" section which focuses on recent stories related to Dr. Charles Smith. It can be found at: http://www.thestar.com/topic/charlessmith. Information on "The Charles Smith Blog Award"- and its nomination process - can be found at: http://smithforensic.blogspot.com/2011/05/charles-smith-blog-award-nominations.html Please send any comments or information on other cases and issues of interest to the readers of this blog to: hlevy15@gmail.com. Harold Levy; Publisher; The Charles Smith Blog;